Some Albuquerque businesses going cashless due to ongoing coin shortage and robberies

The ongoing coin shortage is impacting some New Mexico businesses, forcing them to go cashless. In Albuquerque, there are multiple factors at play.At Burritos Alinstante, customers are met with signs reading “no cash accepted” and “credit cards only.” The owner, Mary Ellen Chavez, said she made the call last month […]

The ongoing coin shortage is impacting some New Mexico businesses, forcing them to go cashless. In Albuquerque, there are multiple factors at play.At Burritos Alinstante, customers are met with signs reading “no cash accepted” and “credit cards only.” The owner, Mary Ellen Chavez, said she made the call last month for all six of her locations.“This is catching people off guard that’s not ready for it,” said William Barnard, a customer without a credit/debit card. “People like myself don’t have credit cards.”Since the start of the pandemic, some businesses have chosen to go cashless in part due to a national coin shortage that some say is still a problem.RELATED: Empty shelves and price hikes: Here are the shortages we saw this year and what got more expensive“One of my management team ended up at seven different banks trying to get change to get all of the stores through,” Chavez said.Chavez said local banks haven’t had enough change for a long time and so in December they made all of their locations cashless, but we found that wasn’t the only reason. She said this location off-Broadway is dealing with another big problem.“We had been robbed repeatedly and our employees were feeling very insecure and unsafe and it was happening every week or every two weeks,” Chavez said. “I think after six robberies, we said, ‘OK, we have to make a change.’”RELATED: Albuquerque business goes cashless after being robbed multiple times The threat of getting robbed was also a driving force behind the owner of this soap and candle shop in Nob Hill going cashless.“I can only assume and hope that no one wants to come in here and just rob me for a bunch of soap if I don’t have cash,” said Jordan Gately, owner of LaVonBlu.He said most of his customers don’t mind the change. But, going cashless could impact business for others like Burritos Alinstante. Barnard said it’s one of his favorite restaurants. “Because of them doing that, I’m not going to be able to go over there and support them like I did because I’m only cash,” Barnard said.Chavez said some customers have told them they won’t come back, and business dropped about 7 to 9% for a little while, but it has since leveled out. She also wants people to know the decision was not politically motivated and finds it’s worth it for the safety of her employees.

The ongoing coin shortage is impacting some New Mexico businesses, forcing them to go cashless. In Albuquerque, there are multiple factors at play.

At Burritos Alinstante, customers are met with signs reading “no cash accepted” and “credit cards only.” The owner, Mary Ellen Chavez, said she made the call last month for all six of her locations.

“This is catching people off guard that’s not ready for it,” said William Barnard, a customer without a credit/debit card. “People like myself don’t have credit cards.”

Since the start of the pandemic, some businesses have chosen to go cashless in part due to a national coin shortage that some say is still a problem.

RELATED: Empty shelves and price hikes: Here are the shortages we saw this year and what got more expensive

“One of my management team ended up at seven different banks trying to get change to get all of the stores through,” Chavez said.

Chavez said local banks haven’t had enough change for a long time and so in December they made all of their locations cashless, but we found that wasn’t the only reason. She said this location off-Broadway is dealing with another big problem.

“We had been robbed repeatedly and our employees were feeling very insecure and unsafe and it was happening every week or every two weeks,” Chavez said. “I think after six robberies, we said, ‘OK, we have to make a change.’”

RELATED: Albuquerque business goes cashless after being robbed multiple times

The threat of getting robbed was also a driving force behind the owner of this soap and candle shop in Nob Hill going cashless.

“I can only assume and hope that no one wants to come in here and just rob me for a bunch of soap if I don’t have cash,” said Jordan Gately, owner of LaVonBlu.

He said most of his customers don’t mind the change. But, going cashless could impact business for others like Burritos Alinstante. Barnard said it’s one of his favorite restaurants.

“Because of them doing that, I’m not going to be able to go over there and support them like I did because I’m only cash,” Barnard said.

Chavez said some customers have told them they won’t come back, and business dropped about 7 to 9% for a little while, but it has since leveled out. She also wants people to know the decision was not politically motivated and finds it’s worth it for the safety of her employees.

https://www.koat.com/article/some-albuquerque-businesses-going-cashless-due-to-ongoing-coin-shortage-and-robberies/38919179

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